Be Decisive With Pediatric Decision Making Self Assessment Part 1

Pediatrics MOC

When we last left off, I had only receive 10 Points toward my total of 20 Part 2 Lifelong Learning and Self Assessment points:

I was previously going through the Pediatric Decision Making Self Assessment activity. Which when completed would yield me 20 more points on the Big Board, half of the 40 points required for Part 2: Pediatric Maintenance of Certification (MOC).

However, this was not a softball toss since a minimum score of 80% was required to grab this 20-point brass ring. Simple enough?

How I felt when I found out I needed 80% correct answers on the pediatrics decision skills self assessment test

Not really! You are given 50 case scenarios, and a score of 80% means you cannot miss more than 10 of these (you might want to check the math). It is all or none, you might understand much of what you are reading but if you choose the wrong answer there is no going back. This is not one of those CME tests you answer until you get the right answer which by the way, is my favorite type of CME test since the creation of the internet by Al Gore.

It really isn’t a “self assessment” since you are being assessed by the American Board of Pediatrics based on the decisions you “commit to”. I would call it more of an assessment by the ABP of whether you can keep your Pediatric certification. But lets not get caught up in semantics.

How I feel when I get a pediatrics MOC question correct

I was handled a nice big slice of humble pie when I did not hit the decision making hammer hard enough to hit the 80% bell. It seems I missed the 80% by taking this activity too lightly. I did it in several sittings. Often when I was tired at the end of a long day or while listening to the theme song from Law and Order on iTunes rather than ocean sounds as recommended in a previous blog.

Honestly, I did not follow my own advice of going through the answers in detail. I just wanted to get through them and get my 20 points so I can continue working as a pediatrician.

I now faced just one more chance to ring the bell, there would not be a 3rd chance to get my ticket punched on this relatively easy and useful activity.

This is a very useful activity since it really has value clinically and for preparing for the MOC Pediatric Recertification “secured“ exam.

In several instances you are presented with very similar patients, i.e. 12 year old with leg pain, but the clinical presentation are quite different. This is a great exercise in teaching and demonstrating why and how reading the question is so important and is really hitting at differential diagnosis.

In my next blog, I will tell you how my second attempt went. Stay tuned!